Asked by JIM  |  Submitted May 23, 2016

How much money would I save going from a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage to a 15-year fixed-rate mortgage?

I've been seeing the Rocket Mortgage ad that says switching from a 30-year to a 15-year mortgage will save you money. What factors should I consider in doing this?

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  Answers  |  5

May 24, 2016

Most likely a lot. At least a couple of hundred a month, not to mention all the interest you will save.

$commenter.renderDisplayableName() | 04.23.17 @ 16:01

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May 24, 2016

This is a great idea. Keep in mind that doing this will likely increase your required monthly payment (due to the shorter loan term), so if you are OK with that you can indeed save a ton of interest.

$commenter.renderDisplayableName() | 04.23.17 @ 16:01

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May 25, 2016

To answer your question, find an Amortization schedule online and plug in your own numbers. An example on a $200,000 loan at 3% interest for both loans would save you $54,944 in interest. If you can't afford a 15-year loan, then you are buying too much house. Good luck!

$commenter.renderDisplayableName() | 04.23.17 @ 16:01

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May 26, 2016

The amount of interest saved on a 15-year mortgage versus a 30-year can be staggering. If you can manage the higher payment comfortably and still manage to save effectively, than it may be a good option for you.

$commenter.renderDisplayableName() | 04.23.17 @ 16:01

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June 01, 2016

You will definitely save money in the long run by going from a 30-year term to a 15-year. Here are a few things to consider:

1) How long do you have left on your current 30-year mortgage?
Are you 8 or 10 years into a 30-year mortgage already? If so, read #2 for sure.

2) How much will it cost to refinance?
There are always closing costs to consider when refinancing. You need to look at how much you anticipate saving in interest versus the closing costs (regardless of whether or not they're financed into the loan). If you only have 20 years left on your term or so, sometimes you can achieve a 15-year payoff of your current balance by simply adding a little more to your current payment. A quality mortgage professional worth their salt will do these calculations for you without worrying about "selling a loan."

3) Can you afford the new payment?
Sure, you will more than likely save money in the long run, but if the new higher payment isn't something you can handle on a long-term basis, then just consider increasing your current payment by adding some additional principal to each payment when you can. Unless you're going from a much higher 30-year rate to a really low 15-year rate, your payment is GOING to increase.

Consistency over time is always the key to paying off a mortgage early, but sometimes just committing to paying extra principal when you receive extra bonuses, overtime, or tax refunds can make an enormous difference in your payback period.

$commenter.renderDisplayableName() | 04.23.17 @ 16:01

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