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Asked by Patricia
Answered by MoneyTips Writing Staff
Financial Adviser in Los Angeles, CA
If your score is low, a secured credit card could help rebuild your credit. Check out our list of secured credit card offers. While you're reading, here are som...
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Asked by Gina
Answered by MoneyTips Writing Staff
Financial Adviser in Los Angeles, CA
Here are some informative articles that may help: How to Rebuild Your Credit Score Fast 5 Steps to Rebuild Your Credit Build your Credit Score with a Secured Cred...
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Asked by suzanne
Answered by MoneyTips Writing Staff
Financial Adviser in Los Angeles, CA
You need to contact the credit bureau TransUnion at 800-916-8800 or on its website to notify it that the information is incorrect.
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Asked by Frank
Answered by MoneyTips Writing Staff
Financial Adviser in Los Angeles, CA
Your best bet would be to contact the credit bureau TransUnion at 1-800-916-8800 or on its website to dispute it.
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Asked by Benjamin
Answered by MoneyTips Writing Staff
Financial Adviser in Los Angeles, CA
Poor credit" does not necessarily mean "no credit." Take a moment to read this article on how you can borrow money despite bad credit. While you're ...
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Asked by Regina
Answered by MoneyTips Writing Staff
Financial Adviser in Los Angeles, CA
You need to contact the credit bureau TransUnion at 800-916-8800 or on its website to notify it that the information is incorrect.
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Asked by Teresa
Answered by MoneyTips Writing Staff
Financial Adviser in Los Angeles, CA
Have you recently applied for any other loans or credit cards? Each inquiry for credit results in a check on your credit and may affect your credit score whether you q...
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Asked by Lindsey
Answered by MoneyTips Writing Staff
Financial Adviser in Los Angeles, CA
Contact TransUnion at 800-916-8800 or on its website to notify it that there is a fraudulent account on your report. The credit bureau will address it with the relevan...
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Asked by Angela
Answered by MoneyTips Writing Staff
Financial Adviser in Los Angeles, CA
Hard inquiries, caused by applications for new credit, remain on your credit report for two years. However, they usually only affect your credit score for up to one year.
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Asked by Carlos
Answered by MoneyTips Writing Staff
Financial Adviser in Los Angeles, CA
Watch this video to see Experian Director of Public Education Rod Griffin explain how and why different lenders calculate your score differently and why you have more ...
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