Q&A
Asked by an anonymous user
Answered by MoneyTips Writing Staff, Financial Adviser in Los Angeles, CA
Debt Optimizer analyzes your debt and suggests simple actions to lower interest rates, reduce monthly payments and lift your credit score. Simply log in to your Debt O...
Q&A
Asked by an anonymous user
Answered by Chad Freeman, Branch ManagerPRO+ in Bethesda, MD
Hello: It could be that there are some institutions that may have their own internal overlays that say otherwise, but generally speaking, the answer is "yes". In mo...
Q&A
Asked by Michael
Answered by Pamela J. Horack, , CFP®PRO+ in Lake Wylie, SC
Hi Michael! I'm a huge fan of paying off debt as soon as possible. You can't build your finances up if you are busy filling in a hole of debt. Make a plan to focus all...
Q&A
Asked by Jamie
Answered by Chad Freeman, Branch ManagerPRO+ in Bethesda, MD
Jamie: Thank you for your inquiry. DTI is determined by taking whatever secured debt you have (generally those on your credit report) against your income, represent...
Q&A
Asked by an anonymous user
Answered by Julia M. Carlson, Financial Adviser in Newport, OR
No! It’s generally a poor decision to take from your retirement to pay any bills. The reason is that your 401k is earning and building for what you’ll need later. It’s...
Q&A
Asked by an anonymous user
Answered by Kim Miller, CFP®PRO+ in Redmond, WA
I'm not sure what you are asking - what is "credit reduction"?
Q&A
Asked by AuntieCathie
Answered by Bradford Creger, MoneyTips ContributorPRO+ in Pasadena, CA
Auntie Cathie, Yes, pay off the credit cards – but that’s probably all you should do. I see no one has told you that at today’s low interest rates it is probably m...
Q&A
Asked by Yunas
Answered by Kate Holmes , CFP®PRO+ in Las Vegas, NV
Hi Yunas. It's up to each person how much and what kind of debt they acquire. One of the things I highlighted in "The Millennial Next Door: How To Be Financially Succe...
Q&A
Asked by an anonymous user
Answered by Ted Rood, Mortgage BrokerPRO+ in Maryland Heights, MO
A secured card is likely your best route to go now. A lot of folks think they can 'avoid bad credit" by not using credit, but as far as lenders go, no credit history ...
Q&A
Asked by an anonymous user
Answered by Heath Schneider, Mortgage BrokerPRO+ in Las Vegas, NV
Paying off high interest credit cards with a mortgage is a good idea if you can commit to the new budget and avoid charging up the cards again. Do your best to limit ...
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